Anne Arundel County Food and Resources Bank

Your Food and Resources for Anne Arundel County

HELPING The way of life for residents of Anne Arundel County families

                             CFC #44381
 MD Charity Campaign #1858


~~Founded in 1986, the Food Bank is the only free, multi-purpose Agency in Maryland that provides food, nutritional supplements, medical equipment, furniture, vehicles, appliances, and more to those in need, free of charge. We work alongside local county government, community, and civic organizations to identify and address needs. These organizations include the Department of Social Services, Service Coordination, Crisis Response, Child Protective Services, and Family support Center, Personal Pupil Workers of A.A. Public Schools, Department of Aging, Community Action, Ordinance Road Detention Center, Red Cross and others.


43,730 people in Anne Arundel County are food insecure, unsure where they will get their next meal. Of this 16.3% or 20,210 are children. (Feeding America, 2011) This data understates the true extent of the problem because the cost of living in Anne Arundel County is well above the national poverty line. The chart below from Poverty Amidst Plenty, The Two Faces of Anne Arundel County, 2012 depict the huge gap Anne Arundel County residents need to be self-sufficient compared to the National Average.

~~43% of people in Anne Arundel County residents cannot afford fair market rent (US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 2010). In 2012 there were 1096 homeless students in Anne Arundel County schools. This has nearly doubled since 2008 (Poverty Amidst Plenty, 2012) Nutrition is essential to growth, development, mental and physical health, concentration, scholastic achievement, and strengthens the immune system. To ensure these students and other students in need maintain proper nutrition we started back pack programs ensuring proper nutrition is maintained when schools are closed. This is especially helpful over long breaks. During the summer months we support seasonal feeding programs at schools, churches, summer camps and other locations throughout Anne Arundel County making nutritious foods accessible to students when free school lunches are not offered.


The recession had a huge impact on hunger in Anne Arundel County. This is evident in the 50% increase in households receiving food stamps between 2007 and 2009, the 38% increase in households assisted by pantries and the 133% increase experienced by our onsite feeding programs over the past five years. 56% of food insecure residents in Anne Arundel County are above the national poverty line and therefore unable to receive food stamps. (U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, 2010) Our unemployment has made minimal improvement decreasing .5% from 2011 to 2012. The housing market crash prevented those in crisis to be unable to sell their homes. Many families were forced to foreclose and move in with family or friends making them essentially homeless and further in dept.


In the past week we have had new clients seeking help due to the government shut down. In one week over $3,100 of food was given to federal government employees. When they come in they say “I would have never dreamed it would have come to this” proving everyone is susceptible. Most families are only a pay check or two away from financial insecurity.


Over the past fiscal year we distributed over $1.6 million worth of food to our member agencies (pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, etc.) This is $.4 million more than last year. The following charts depict this massive increase in need that two of our programs faced.


Our 79 pantries distributed over 210,500 bags of food to approximately 45,000 families feeding approximately 100,000 people in need assisting 13% families then in FY 12. The Anne Arundel County Food & Resource Bank works with the Department of Human Resources to make sure that congregate feeding sites always have a hot meal to offer.  In FY 13, our soup kitchens served over 700,000 nutritious meals to homeless and hungry citizens in our county. Serving 32% more people than in FY12. We also host a Nutritional Diet Program to helps families whose needs go beyond standard food pantry items. The goal of the Nutritional Diet Program is to ensure that seniors and infants with diet constraints are not left at risk of hunger or malnutrition, which could increase poor health. The past year 2,500 families were assisted through this program.  


Over 10% of County residents between ages 18 and 64 reported that they lacked any kind of health care insurance in 2010. This means there are approximately 36,000 working‐age adults in our community without health insurance. (Department, 2012) Inadequate health coverage jeopardizes financial security. Not only are hospitals and Doctors’ visits expensive but so are essential medical equipment.  To defray costs we offer a medical loan program to the uninsured and under insured. In FY 13 we assisted almost 100 people with equipment valued at over $100,000.


Our next two programs, the Furniture Program and Wheels for Work Program are aimed to save clients’ money by providing costly basic necessities including furniture, appliances, household items and vehicles. The Anne Arundel County Food Bank works closely with local community, civic and county and state organizations to identify and address needs. Several of these agencies are D.S.S., Dept. of Aging, Crisis Response, Red Cross, & Housing Authority. This past year, the AACFB assisted 625 families with appliances and 364 families with furniture, exercise equipment and household items valued at over $100,000. Anne Arundel County’s public
transportation is made up of several smaller systems that do not work together nor do they span the entire county. Relying on this system inhibits employment opportunities and makes furthering education challenging.  Almost 10,000 households in 2010 reported that they did not own a vehicle. (Poverty Amidst Plenty, 2012) The Anne Arundel County Food Bank matches donated vehicles to people in need. In FY 13 we distributed 3 vehicles. Two recipients obtained a better job which they have maintained to date. The third is obtaining a higher education. 

The Anne Arundel County Food Bank also assists other non-profits that share in our mission. In FY 13 we
assisted:

  • The Emmaus Center with an 8’ stainless steel kitchen sink to be used in their new homeless center. 

  • We work with scouts to make troops welcome bags and care packages to send to troops oversees. 

  • We donated exercise equipment for soldiers on temporary leave to keep in shape for battle. 

  • Collect eye glasses for the Lions Club to be recycled and used to prevent blindness worldwide through the Lions Club’s Sight Program. 

  • Uneatable foods are donated to the Davidsonville Wildlife Sanctuary to feed rescued animals.

  • We opened our first pet pantry at the ASPCA in Glen Burnie, MD. Pet food and supplies are sent to support their cause and assist animal owners in need. 

  • We work with Pupil People Workers from school systems to assist students in need with school supplies, book bags, clothes and other items upon request. 

  • During the winter months, churches open their doors to house and feed the homeless The AACFB supplies food, toiletries, blankets, clothes and other items requested to serve their needs. 

  • For holidays we assist local pantries, the Department of Social Services and other service-oriented agencies with food for holiday baskets and presents for children and their families. These services

  • are supported by AACFB food drives, and organizations that donate to support this cause. 

  • Happy Helpers for the Homeless is a volunteer program that prepares and distributes lunches, clothes, school supplies and other necessities to the homeless and the less fortunate.  For many years, they operated under the Food Bank’s tax exempt authorization.

  • We work with the Annapolis Police Department providing coats, clothing, food, school supplies and other items upon request to assist people in need.

  • Success Stories, Letter of Appreciation and News Paper articles expand on how together we improve quality of life and help those in crisis get out of crisis and become self-sufficient. 

The following
agencies have an ongoing relationship with the AACFB to assist their clients
with emergency food, furniture, school supplies, medical equipment, infant
supplies, special diet needs, personal hygiene products, children's toys and
vehicles. 

 

  A.     Housing Authority City of Annapolis
  B.     A. A. County Department of Social Services
  C.     A. A. County Department of Health
  D.     A. A. County Department of Aging
  E.      A. A. County Crisis Response System
  F.      A. A. County Community Care Partnership Program
  G.     A. A. Community Action
  H.     Child Protective Services
  I.       The Fouse Center
  J.      Service Coordination, Inc.
  K.     Community Residences
  L.      Salvation Army
  M.    WIC
  N.     A.A. Medical Center
  O.     Hospice of the Chesapeake
  P.      Priority Partners
  
Q.     Housing Commission of A. A. County 

  R.     YWCA
  S.      Annapolis Family Support Center
  T.      Medical Management Rehabilitation Services
  U.     Annapolis Family Support Center
  V.     A. A. County Economic Opportunity Committee, Inc.
  W.   Active Day Medical Adult Day Care
  X.     Partnership Development, Inc.
  Y.     Partners in Care
  Z.      Red Cross
  AA.   Food Link
  BB.   Department Labor & Licensing
  CC.   A.A.C. Public Schools
  DD.   Infant and Toddlers Program
 

The staff of the Food Bank includes a full-time Director, an administrator, caseworker, a warehouse manager, IT Consultant, driver and one part time driver, along with assistance of countless volunteers. Donations are solicited through food drives, local markets, and food wholesale distributors. The goal of our
programs is to help get people out of crisis, assist them in becoming stable, by providing all of our services free of charge we enable them to save money allowing them to save and ultimately become self-sufficient. 


We have had a very successful year and will continue our work and mission of fighting hunger, assuring that all of those in need have access to food, furniture, appliances and durable medical equipment. Here are some letters from clients on how we made a difference improving their quality of life and a list of our member agencies (i.e. pantries, soup kitchens, shelters, etc.)


Provided By: Susan Thomas

Updated Statistics of who we help!